Common Revolt

My Devil in Your Eyes - The Color MoraleRelease Date: March 8th, 2011Record Label: Rise Records
Most people would automatically write off a band like The Color Morale for reasons like being unoriginal, breakdown riddled, and a generic band signed by Rise. Sure the band has breakdowns and they are like a lot of other Rise bands, but The Color Morale is one of the best bands doing what they do. The band’s first record, We All Have Demons, struck a chord with some listeners because of a different sense of musicality that doesn’t focus on solely breakdowns, but more focuses on melodies and structured instrumentals. Luckily, The Color Morale didn’t lose any of this sense and took all the faults of first album, even though there weren’t many, and created My Devil in Your Eyes.The album starts off with the hard-hitting opening track, “Nerve Endings.” Unfortunately, the song does start with some chugging breakdowns which could turn away some listeners, but thankfully the amount of chugging in this song (which isn’t even much) is the most chugging on the entire CD.  Letting the chugging aside, the next track was the first song that the band released on their Facebook, “Human(s)being.” I’d have to say this is the most maturely structured song on the album. During the entire album the drumming can easy be missed and overlooked, but this song puts an emphasis on the ability of drummer, Steve Carey, especially during the chorus when the vocals are carried by the double bass and the other instruments which creates a beautiful moment. Fortunately, the album has many beautiful moments. Something that we’ve never heard the band do before is be a legitimately angry hardcore band. Luckily the band has included a track on the album that shows just how angry sounding the band can be. “Demon Teeth” starts off with a little drum solo that will make you think the song will sound like the rest, but in reality the song is hiding a storm of guitar riffs and barrages of instrumentals reminiscent of Underoath. This song is not exactly the best song on the album, but crowds will definitely love it live and is sure to get a huge pit going and crowd vocals from the end of the venue to the front. The last two songs on the album are yet again, something completely different than what is expected. Throughout the entire album the band capitalizes on the dual vocal/screaming abilities of Garret Rapp. “This Lost Song Is Yours” features no screamed vocals in the entire song, making it one if the standout tracks on the CD. Rapp is one of the best singers on Rise’s roster, if not in the entire hardcore scene, and he definitely shows it on this album. His vocals float gracefully over the instrumental work of his band mates. The last song on the album, “Fill;Avoid,” is definitely a stand out track on the album simply because of the way it closes the album. The instruments used to make the track were all reversed making it sound very symphonic and beautiful. Like the rest of the album, the vocals are spot on during the song, but have a much more softer tone to them. About half-way through the song, the instruments switch from reversed back to normal. The song closes out the album with a piano playing the melody in unison of the words, “You made me from dust and not dirt.” If you enjoyed the band’s first album this album will probably impress you on how much more tight sounding the band has become. If you are a new listener to the band and want to hear one of the best hardcore bands, pick this album up on March 8th!Reviewed by: Jared OhgrenVerdict: ★★★½ /★★★★★ The Color Morale is:Garret Rapp - VocalsRamon Mendoza - Guitar John Bross - Guitar Justin Hieser - BassSteve Carey - DrumsTracklisting:
Nerve Endings
Human(s)being Ft. Chad Ruhlig*
The Dying Hymn*
Be Longing Always
Walkers
Demon Teeth Ft. Joey Sturgis*
Falling Awake
Quote On Quote Ft. Chris Roeter
This Lost Song Is Yours *
Fill;Avoid *

My Devil in Your Eyes - The Color Morale
Release Date: March 8th, 2011
Record Label: Rise Records


Most people would automatically write off a band like The Color Morale for reasons like being unoriginal, breakdown riddled, and a generic band signed by Rise. Sure the band has breakdowns and they are like a lot of other Rise bands, but The Color Morale is one of the best bands doing what they do. The band’s first record, We All Have Demons, struck a chord with some listeners because of a different sense of musicality that doesn’t focus on solely breakdowns, but more focuses on melodies and structured instrumentals. Luckily, The Color Morale didn’t lose any of this sense and took all the faults of first album, even though there weren’t many, and created My Devil in Your Eyes.

The album starts off with the hard-hitting opening track, “Nerve Endings.” Unfortunately, the song does start with some chugging breakdowns which could turn away some listeners, but thankfully the amount of chugging in this song (which isn’t even much) is the most chugging on the entire CD.  Letting the chugging aside, the next track was the first song that the band released on their Facebook, “Human(s)being.” I’d have to say this is the most maturely structured song on the album. During the entire album the drumming can easy be missed and overlooked, but this song puts an emphasis on the ability of drummer, Steve Carey, especially during the chorus when the vocals are carried by the double bass and the other instruments which creates a beautiful moment. Fortunately, the album has many beautiful moments.


Something that we’ve never heard the band do before is be a legitimately angry hardcore band. Luckily the band has included a track on the album that shows just how angry sounding the band can be. “Demon Teeth” starts off with a little drum solo that will make you think the song will sound like the rest, but in reality the song is hiding a storm of guitar riffs and barrages of instrumentals reminiscent of Underoath. This song is not exactly the best song on the album, but crowds will definitely love it live and is sure to get a huge pit going and crowd vocals from the end of the venue to the front.

The last two songs on the album are yet again, something completely different than what is expected. Throughout the entire album the band capitalizes on the dual vocal/screaming abilities of Garret Rapp. “This Lost Song Is Yours” features no screamed vocals in the entire song, making it one if the standout tracks on the CD. Rapp is one of the best singers on Rise’s roster, if not in the entire hardcore scene, and he definitely shows it on this album. His vocals float gracefully over the instrumental work of his band mates. The last song on the album, “Fill;Avoid,” is definitely a stand out track on the album simply because of the way it closes the album. The instruments used to make the track were all reversed making it sound very symphonic and beautiful. Like the rest of the album, the vocals are spot on during the song, but have a much more softer tone to them. About half-way through the song, the instruments switch from reversed back to normal. The song closes out the album with a piano playing the melody in unison of the words, “You made me from dust and not dirt.”

If you enjoyed the band’s first album this album will probably impress you on how much more tight sounding the band has become. If you are a new listener to the band and want to hear one of the best hardcore bands, pick this album up on March 8th!

Reviewed by: Jared Ohgren

Verdict: ★★★½ /★★★★★

The Color Morale is:
Garret Rapp - Vocals
Ramon Mendoza - Guitar

John Bross - Guitar
Justin Hieser - Bass
Steve Carey - Drums

Tracklisting:

  1. Nerve Endings
  2. Human(s)being Ft. Chad Ruhlig*
  3. The Dying Hymn*
  4. Be Longing Always
  5. Walkers
  6. Demon Teeth Ft. Joey Sturgis*
  7. Falling Awake
  8. Quote On Quote Ft. Chris Roeter
  9. This Lost Song Is Yours *
  10. Fill;Avoid *

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